Tag Archives: Editorial

A Farewell To Vanna

Where We Are Now, The Sun Sets Here for Vanna

For over a decade, Boston’s Vanna have been creating aggressive music for us to sing along and swing our fists to. Vanna has helped me get through some tough times and made others great. They will remain a part of my life through their music that I will continue to listen to even after they’ve closed the curtains.

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‘We Have No Heroes’: Punk, Hardcore, Positivity In Our Time Of Unrest

There are select moments in history when the entire world is engaged in one singular conversation. We are living in one of those moments.

I showed up at Boontunes, a music venue/record shop in Boonton, NJ on Saturday night November the 12th, 2016, one night after I had engaged in a love rally that marched from Washington Square Park to Trump Tower in New York City. It was just supposed to be another night on the local band circuit, hanging with friends, doing my job as a journalist, and supporting the vinyl release of local hardcore act Hell Mary. What I got was so much more.

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How Hardcore Can Make You A Better Person

Bradley Walden of Emarosa
Bradley Walden of Emarosa

Anything can make you a better person if you let it. Scratch that. Rephrase: Anything can make you a better person if you work with it. Being the best “you” takes effort. Hardcore, as far as music genres go, is uniquely capable of aiding in that process.

Hardcore doesn’t initially sound pleasant or happy or pretty to anyone who hears it for the first time, and that’s not by accident. It’s abrasive and grating and loud for a purpose: To confront the things in life that aren’t necessarily pleasant or happy or pretty. To talk about issues other genres don’t talk about. Let yourself listen to it for a little while, allow the rough sounds to sink in and become familiar, and you start to understand. You begin to tap your fingers, to bang your head and to feel something–the reasons behind the screams. It becomes more and more clear that form, as it always does, reflects content, and that the sounds of raw emotion coupled with the meaning of thoughtful lyrics create music that is more than music. Hardcore—the songs, the lifestyle, and the code of ethics—is a powerful guide if you pay attention to what it has to say.

Look in the basement of your heart
There is a light that just went dark
Look through the wreckage to find reverie
There is a truth that we all must see
       — 
The Path,” Senses Fail (Renacer, 2013)

It’s no secret that hardcore deals with some of the more “negative” emotions. For this reason, it also tends to sound pretty harsh. These very characteristics that draw people to hardcore are what repel others from it. Usually, it’s a matter of how naturally comfortable or willing you are to sort through those kinds of emotions. And this is the first way hardcore can help you become a better person.

Hardcore provides a space for you to confront and work through suffering. Life is messy and troubling. Everyone has problems with it. It’s hard. Sometimes, though what you may want most is to forget about what bothers you, what you need most is to go through the pain; to “look in the basement of your heart,” as Senses Fail phrase it in their song, “The Path.” Hardcore music helps you realize the things that may feel bad or negative are just part of life. In a way, they’re not really negative at all. Hardcore not only sympathizes with you, but reminds you that it’s okay not to be okay sometimes. At the risk of sounding like a fortune cookie: From suffering comes strength, from self-reflection comes wisdom.

In these goddamn dark nights I start to realize
This is war.
I’m gonna have to fight tooth and nail,
Tooth and nail just to stay alive.

Look at me, I’m living proof.
You’re not alone, we have each other and we’ll pull through.
This chapter’s called “you’re alive.”
You’ve been writing it this whole time.
So come back to life.

Don’t write, don’t write your ending.
 
— “Digging,” Vanna (Void, 2014)

Not only can hardcore help you realize that the tough times are worth going through, but also that you’re not alone in going through them. Hardcore is as much about the individual as it is about a community; a community of outcasts, of misfits, of weirdos. If you’re having trouble, this is the place for you. We know what it’s like and we’ll help you through it. As Vanna say in their anthem “Digging,” “You’re not alone, we have each other and we’ll pull through.” Keep going, keep pushing, and you’ll find something worth sticking around for, even if you have to fight “tooth and nail.”

Just as important as accepting others is the ability to accept yourself for who you are. This genre is perfect for wrestling with that, too. Again, I use Senses Fail as an example:

I have learned to love myself
I have learned to care
I have learned to make peace
With the sadness and despair…
…I want to love with the courage of an open heart.
             — “The Courage Of An Open Heart,” Senses Fail (Pull The Thorns From Your Heart, 2015)

Being vulnerable is scary. Leaving yourself open to getting hurt by opening up to others is difficult to do, and for that reason most people avoid it as much as possible. Hardcore itself offers conflicting messages about this. The “fuck this” or “fuck you” attitude is a huge part of hardcore and its progenitor, punk. Although it may seem contradictory, you can say “fuck this” or “fuck you” and at the same time be open-minded and vulnerable and strong. How? By realizing that these words aren’t all antonyms for each other. Stand up for what you think is right, and stand against what you think is wrong, and don’t let people tear you down, but at the end of the day, don’t shut everything and everyone out either. Love with the courage of an open heart.”

Speaking of sticking up for your beliefs, traditional hardcore has a very strong code of ethics concerning staying true to who you are. One of the biggest hardcore bands in the modern age, Terror, dedicates an album to it–2013’s Live By The Code. The title track’s lyrics elaborate on just what that means:

Convictions you built in me /A sense of purpose, firm standing beliefs / We’ve kept traditions, held with clear aims / Respect the roots, but we live for today / Fighting against the grain / Live by the code, the diehard remain / The ethics, traditions kept / Live by the code, the freedom to live / Live by the code / Foundation, you are my strength / You are my rock, the anchor I need / Keep me honest, you keep me tight/  The freedom to live, I remain positive / Fighting against the grain / Live by the code, the die hard remain / The ethics, traditions kept /Live by the code, the freedom to live / Desperation, the broken, we found honor / Live by the code, the music and our culture / Live by the code, the roots and the ethics they have taught us / I believe in now, the new breed /  LIVE BY THE CODE!
            — “Live by The Code,” Terror (Live By The Code, 2013)

While we hardcore kids may put up a middle finger to many things in this world, there is a strong sense of morality behind the gesture. In this way, hardcore music can give you the strength to be yourself against all odds as well as the encouragement to get up and take action. The music video for “Live By The Code” is also a great example of why this scene is as much a culture as it is a collection of records. Sure, it can be super aggressive and even somewhat dangerous, but shows provide a communal space for people to let out their aggression in a positive way that doesn’t end up in destructive, mass violence like you see on primetime news channels. It’s a positive outlet for negative things, and I guarantee you that most of the time after you see people slamming into each other at shows, you’ll see them hugging it out and smiling moments later.

The importance of self-reflection, understanding, acceptance, suffering, individualism, community, empowerment, identity, compassion, self-sufficiency, hard work, dedication, creativity–these are just some of the lessons hardcore has to teach those who are willing to listen and learn. It’s a place to turn to; a home. There are countless other lyrics from countless other bands that could keep illustrating my point, but at the end of the day, what you need to know is this: 

Hardcore is burning through my veins
Without you who the fuck would I be?
Gave me a place to call my own
This will forever be my home.
          — “The New Blood,” Terror (Keepers of the Faith, 2010) 

Aiden, Wil Francis, Thank You and See You in Hell

Photo Credit: Nicole Spangenburg
Photo Credit: Nicole Spangenburg

Now I’ll flat out say it: I wasn’t around for the hype period of Aiden. I am 18. I remember being younger, though, and having older friends who were into Aiden. I remember being in my friend’s room, during the time when the band was on hiatus, and falling in love so fast with their 2006 Rain In Hell EP, especially the song “We Sleep Forever.” I kept hoping Aiden would return one day, but settled on seeing their former vocalist and frontman Wil Francis (a.k.a. William Control) do his solo act.

Aiden went on hiatus after their 2011 album Some Kind Of Hate, when the members decided the band was no longer sustainable. “Towards the end it was clear that punk rock wasn’t going to pay the bills,” stated William Control on his Facebook page nearly a year ago, “which is why both Angel [Ibarra] and Jake [Davison] left the band initially.” But some months ago, Wil announced that he was writing a new, final, and self-titled Aiden record in an open letter to his former bandmates. Word was then put out that Aiden would be playing a final tour, The Last Sunrise Tour, on which they would play their beloved 2005 record Nightmare Anatomy in full.

Finally, the day I wished for came. The show was a small basement show on November 7th at Backroom Studios in Rockaway, New Jersey. I know most of my friends had seen Aiden before this tour and just wanted this one last time. For me, it was going to be the first and the last.

I was packed in a small room filled with people. There was a 70 person cap at the venue, and there were no less than 70 people there for Aiden. There was no barricade, no stage. I was offered nicely to stand up in the front by a girl who I wish now I could find again. When the stage was being set up for Aiden, I realized the mic stand had been placed at my feet. “If this is how I’m going to see Aiden one last, first time,” I thought, “then this is perfect.”

Finally, with no other way to enter, the members came in through the crowd, with Wil being the only original member. I looked to him and saw William Control become Wil Francis of Aiden one final time. He came in front of me, grabbed the mic and screamed, “This is Aiden!” All of a sudden, my face was in the chest of leather and smoke.

“What a beautiful way to see the last Aiden show. This is the reason I started a band, to play basement shows,” William screamed out to us. It made me feel like he didn’t want this to end ever; he wanted Aiden to still be a part of his life. Due to bitter ties and bad behavior, it had been ended. But that was in the past now. This tour was about making the fans happy. No matter when it was that you discovered Aiden, this show was about making all 70 people in the room feel special.

I had many friends who went to Aiden shows before the hiatus. They used to say that Wil didn’t treat them right and that he just never looked interested to meet fans. It left a bitter taste in some people’s mouths. I knew people who met him later as William Control and said he seemed different; more open. This was the Wil that appeared that night, and for a lot of people, it was personal and lovely.

At the beginning of the set, before they played Nightmare, Wil fell on top of me by mistake. He looked at me, pulled me in for a hug, and kissed my cheek. I couldn’t stop smiling at him that whole night. He took a break to drink and a girl jokingly asked him if she could have some, too. “Please, I’m dying,” she said. He came to her, laughing, and poured water down on her. He screamed, “We’re all dying, darling.” I never saw a woman more happy in her life.

When the last song of the set came (“World By Storm”), Wil thanked us all while the crowd poured him all their love, physically and emotionally. What I saw next was the most powerful thing. Wil pressed his hands against people’s heads and kissed their foreheads. When he walked off the stage, he hugged every single human being in that room. This included myself, upon which he told me, “Thank you for coming and loving me, darling.”

While it sucked–really, still does–to see a band like Aiden go away, I know this was the best way of seeing them. And as a fan, I wanted to leave a small open letter of my own to end this:

Wil,

Thank you. For making that whole room feel something. For letting that whole room wish you goodbye in one good fashion. I hope this made you realize we do care. You treated us like we were your friends. You let us become really personal with you in that hour. I met some new friends and became closer with my old ones during that show. Thank you for letting Aiden touch my life once again and the lives of the 70 people in that small room. You were right. It was the most beautiful place to see Aiden for the last time.

by Liz Rainey 

Toby Driver At The Stone

kayodot

Kayo Dot self-describes as “avant goth”, “progressive experimental doom”, and “abstract modern composition”. A bit outside the realm of mainstream metal, but they’ve got a following of their own. So much so that member Toby Driver had his own six night residency at The Stone in New York City this past August, featuring Kayo Dot and some of his other musical projects. 

Guest writer Brad Cryan attended the event and reviewed his experiences there in this six part piece. You’ll find the first installment featuring maudlin of the Well below, and the rest will follow throughout the week over on our Tumblr page. 

TOBY DRIVER AT THE STONE
by Brad Cryan 

Dozens of young White men line an unassuming East Village block. Some passersby do double takes at all the lanky, septum-pierced, black-clad misfits. What the hell is going on here? One man, curious but not shocked, engages me in conversation.

“This used to be a bar called The World. I used to come here all the time. Lot of good Black music, Latino music – everything. It really was the world.”

“What happened?”

“Someone got shot. They shut it down. Heh. The shot that shut The World down. Haven’t been in there since.”

8/25/15: maudlin of the Well

This dingy little room on the corner of 2nd Street and Avenue C was repurposed some years ago to the chagrin of the surrounding Black and Latino community, but it’s not finished making history. This week, it plays host to a six-night residency and career retrospective of metalhead, singer-songwriter and all around avant-garde weirdo, Toby Driver. His first band, maudlin of the Well (the M is lowercase), plays its first show in 14 years tonight.

Towards the beginning of the set, the band plays “Girl With A Watering Can,” a longish song that starts off quietly but builds into massive metal riffage. The sound is shit, and the band turns knobs in a continuous war against feedback, but it doesn’t matter. What matters is that every cell in every body is vibrating. maudlin’s sound features fleeting moments of delicacy that cut through their aggressive metal aesthetic – a delicacy that Driver would devote his entire post-maudlin career to exploring. But maudlin sounds best at their most elemental.

Toby rarely does encores, but this is a special night. The last song that maudlin of the Well ever plays, ever, is “Birth Pains Of Astral Projections,” a prog odyssey from their early days. This time, it isn’t just a song. It’s a reconciliation between brothers.

maudlin

LA’s Emo Night Brings Back More Than Music

Taking Back Tuesday July Promo
Taking Back Tuesday July Promo

Once a month, in the epicenter of hipster culture in Los Angeles, the Echoplex opens its doors for Taking Back Tuesday—a night that brings every “emo” kid together to listen to their favorite 2000-2006 jams. A group of DJs spin their favorite emo tunes and a special guest DJ usually plays later in the evening; everyone from members of Senses Fail to Blink-182 have played a set. So this June, two friends and I caked on the eyeliner, pulled on our band t-shirts, and headed into Silverlake to see what Taking Back Tuesday (or #EmoNightLA, as it’s also known) was all about.

The Echoplex, as a venue, has seen rock stars of all types, including The Rolling Stones, Beck, NIN, and The Mars Volta. It’s a small venue (capacity caps at 700) and it has that rock ’n’ roll smell of stale beer and deodorants mingling together. Taking Back Tuesday looked like every My Chemical Romance concert I went to over the last decade. But even more importantly, it felt like every My Chemical Romance, every Taking Back Sunday, every Blink 182 concert I’ve ever attended. All these people, men and women with varying degrees of dyed hair and tattoos, came together to celebrate this music and what it does for them.

This is music that grabs hold of someone and sticks to them like sap on a car windshield. No matter how hard you scrape, this shit is on you. It pulled me into a strange time warp, where it didn’t matter that no one was playing an instrument on stage because I felt like I was back at my first concert. It took me back an entire decade, back well before this kind of music was popular—back to a time when I got shit for being an emo kid.

When emo first gained popularity in the early 2000s, the word was widely used derisively. People used it to put down the music and the people who identified with it. Being an emo kid was almost like wearing a target to school that said “I FEEL MY FEELINGS HARDCORE,” giving other insecure middle and high school kids the opportunity to pick on them.

Once I got to the Echoplex and saw the enthusiastic crowd and the excitement, however, I realized things have since shifted. Now, emo kids—or former emo kids who like to dabble in the culture—have taken back the word. There was a feeling in the room, which was amplified by the DJs, that being an emo kid is cool now. The DJs asked, “How are all you emo kids doing tonight?” to which they got an uproarious response from the crowd. No one felt picked on or shamed for being there. It was about celebrating the music and the culture associated with it.

If you look closely at actual lyrics, it’s easy to see why these bands resonate so strongly with confused adolescents (and struggling 20somethings). In the My Chemical Romance song “Thank You For The Venom,” frontman Gerard Way croons, “You’ll never make me leave/ I’ll wear this on my sleeve/ Give me a reason to believe.”  Lost, lonely, and searching for anyone to understand, these lyrics hit close to home for emo kids everywhere. The universal feeling of being misunderstood doesn’t go away entirely when you grow up. People will always misunderstand and overlook and be sort of shitty. You’ll always have to deal with that, and finding a healthy way to channel those feelings constructively, like with music, will always be important.

The feeling emo music gives me is one of acceptance and recognition; like someone turned to me in a moment of my own intense weakness and said, “I get it, this sucks, but you’ve got to stay strong.” That was the feeling that washed over me, like a warm shower, the moment I stepped into the #EmoNightLA crowd. It felt like I had found an old pair of Vans, well worn and held together by colored duck tape, that slipped on like no time had passed. It was like stepping back into my skin.

People jumped, bopped, and moshed to Sum 41, Taking Back Sunday, and Brand New. The moment the opening lyrics of “Fat Lip” blared from the speakers, (“Storming through the party like my name is El Niño/ When I’m hangin’ out drinking in the back of an El Camino/ As a kid, I was a skid and no one knew me by name/ I trashed my own house party cause nobody came”) 300 screaming attendees pushed forward and a mosh pit appeared like a sink hole, pulling in bodies from every direction. The songs that amped up the crowd most were songs about rebellion and being misunderstood, eliciting instant recognition and nostalgic joy.

Emo Night at the Echoplex gives people who never stopped being emo a place to jam together; a place to scream, jump, and enjoy the music that has become part of their soul. It’s a place where the year is 2006, and you’re watching the best damned Warped Tour of your entire life. The fact that this still exists, a decade later, is a testament to how much this music and this community still care. If every night could be Emo Night, then you would know where to find me: Jamming in Silverlake with a bunch of fucking emo kids.

EMO NIGHT IS THE FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH

FOLLOW THEM ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/emonightLA

by Maria Spiridigliozzi

Live Streaming and Hardcore: Match or Misfire?

yahoo live vans warped tour wcar

On June 19th, Yahoo! Screen streamed the first date of Vans Warped Tour 2015 on its Live Nation Channel from the Fairplex in Pomona, CA. The live stream kicks off a hugely important festival for the “underground,” but it also kicks off an important question: Do live concert streaming and hard rock shows really belong together?

We’re all used to seeing live performances on TV by now. Come the Super Bowl, the halftime show is all that matters for many viewers. We watch televised performances from the likes of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, The Oscars, and nightly programs like Jimmy Kimmel Live and Conan. While broadcasted musical events have become commonplace, live concert streaming takes the concept to a next level and thus raises next level questions. When a -core band’s show inside a local venue becomes easily viewable from remote locations, is it just cool or does it take something away? When you can watch Stick To Your Guns play a set from your laptop in bed with some hot cocoa, for example, it inarguably changes the experience. But is it for the better?

Vans Warped Tour and Stick To Your Guns aren’t the only examples of streamed shows, of course, and Yahoo! isn’t the only platform for this market. (Others include IROCKE and ConcertTV & Concert Window, for instance). Various acts from genres all across the board have dabbled in the new digital music phenomenon. Bands like The Ghost Inside, Falling In Reverse, Chelsea Grin, August Burns Red, and Bayside have live streamed their shows via Yahoo!, as have acts like Stone Temple Pilots, Infected Mushroom and Meghan Trainor. On one hand, you might note how fair the platform is to music of all types. Heavy bands aren’t usually deemed noteworthy enough to appear side-by-side with ultra-famous pop singers or widely-known psychedelic trance groups. Alternatively, though it may be nice to see your favorite bands emerge from the more shadowy corners of the music world, there is something about watching their performances from a computer screen that can justifiably raise an eyebrow or two.

yahoo live past shows

I’ll admit, the first time I heard about live concert streaming, I thought it was pretty freakin’ awesome. “No way!” was followed by “I’ve gotta try that!” was followed by “I’m totally living in the future right now!” I actually tuned in to a couple of shows to see what it was like or to see how the bands actually performed live. Each time, I stared at my computer screen allowing that exact same train of thought to pass through my brain…for about 60 seconds. Then I got over it.

Then I started thinking, That’s cool. I’m sure the people who are actually there right now are having fun. Because although being able to watch a live show from your couch is admittedly a neat trick, the initial magic wears off rather quickly. Sure, with pop acts and more mainstream sounds it’s probably a bit different. After all, watching Super Bowl Halftime shows is always fun. But pop, hip-hop, and stadium rock acts are what the doorman of Oz would call a horse of a different color as compared to a hardcore outfit. Those streamline genres are more tailored to broadcast performances. For the most part, vocals are really most of what’s going on in a pop act, and the audio engineers are well-adjusted to those kinds of smooth vocals. But introduce some screaming and growling into the mic, some double bass pedals alongside intense cymbal work, and some crunchy guitars and most live music coming from your home speakers sounds crappy. Even though the actual live show at the venue could be insane, a live hardcore band will never sound as good over your internet connection as it will in person. As it always has with this kind of music, it comes down to the live show, and the thing about live shows is you should probably be there when they happen.

A Hardcore Crowd at NYC's Gramcery Theatre
A Hardcore Crowd at NYC’s Gramcery Theatre

Half of hardcore is the live performance. The recorded tracks are what get you interested perhaps, and they’re definitely what keep you going, but the live show is what it’s all about: being between a certain set of a walls with a certain set of people playing your favorite set of tunes. You go to your favorite venue with familiar graffiti impetuously scribbled on the walls. You stand in a crowd of 50, 100, 500 people wearing shirts of bands you’ll be seeing next month or whose CD you have laying around your car. You get pushed around, jump up and down, thrown front to back, toppled, drowned in the sweat of strangers, get a beer spilled on you, and get close enough to the band that the spit as their screaming flies past your eyelids. To use precise terms, there’s a vibe, an energy you get from the sense of community and from the charisma of the musicians striking chords you’ve heard alone in your room a thousand times. You go to a show to not be alone in your room anymore. You go to a hardcore show because there’s nothing like being at a hardcore show.

True, live streaming can allow you to virtually attend a show you otherwise might not have been able to attend. Boiler Room streams music events from all around the world, making it possible for someone who lives in New York City to “attend” a concert in London. Live streaming also may introduce you to new bands before you decide you want to spend your money on a ticket. However, you don’t get an accurate depiction of what the band in question is actually like because you’re not physically in the space, and you could end up hating a band you might have otherwise loved.

Am I standing atop a hill with a torch in one hand and a mace in the other shouting, “Down with the internet!”? No. Is live concert streaming a terrible development in technology? By no means. However, does it make sense for genres that have historically and culturally found a home in dingy basements and mosh pits? Not in my book.

Bare Meaning: The Role of Women in Music Culture

Photo taken from Pinterest
Photo taken from Pinterest

There has been increasing talk of the lack of women in the hardcore scene lately. Yet for all the talk, there doesn’t seem to be adequate exploration of why this is so or of what’s truly going on here. Relative to other rock genres like metal and alternative, hardcore seems to be the most homogenous and male-dominated of all. The reasons for this phenomenon may be far and wide, but I’d like to point to one particular issue that I’ve noticed in my years of listening to post-hardcore–the lyrics.

YouTuber Jared Dines hilariously sums it up in one of his satirical videos of the scene, “10 Styles of Metal.” A few seconds into the video, when the genre title “POST HARDCORE” holds above his head, Dines elucidates in unclean vocals: “My girlfriend broke up with me/ I’m really upset about it/ It’s really my own fault/ But I’m gonna blame her.” While saying that all post-hardcore bands sport the same lyrical content is an overgeneralization, any fan can laugh at how common and, for the most part, accurate Dines’ criticism actually is. Women tend to be given a certain symbolic status of vixen or betrayer or, like in a recent Ice Nine Kills music video, succubus.

Personally, I love the music metalcore band Ice Nine Kills make, but I’ve got to admit that the video for “The Fastest Way To A Girl’s Heart Is Through Her Ribcage” is troubling. It’s become so commonplace now that we no longer realize it, or if we do, we let it pass by us as mere fact–the idea that woman is the downfall of man. In this particular case, a (sexually) voracious female demon that we watch vocalist Spencer Charnas brutally kill is the subject matter. Coupled with lyrics like “You’d be just as sexy bleeding,” this visual takes the trope to a more obvious extreme. While some of you out there may argue “it’s just a music video” or “you’re taking this too seriously,” I’d like to suggest that sometimes the effects outweigh the intent. Do most guys approach their actions or the art they make with the explicit idea that they’re going to villainize women? I’d like to guess not. But the unconscious ideas are there and they keep getting nonchalantly perpetuated, and in this instance, as an INK fan, become alienating to me.

From_Death_to_Destiny

Perhaps the very icon for this kind of behavior is British powerhouse Asking Alexandria; or, to get right down to it, ex-frontman Danny Worsnop. The cover art for the band’s latest album From Death To Destiny is a prime example of the female figure being reduced to a purely sexual and symbolic role for the male frontman. In the image (above), the woman is placed naked in a vending machine at the male rock star’s disposal should he have a few bucks on him to spare. She is a resource of pleasure for him, an object. In short, she is dehumanized. Take virtually any strand of lyrics from Asking Alexandria over the years and you’ll find something similar. Again, AA is a band I’ve enjoyed listening to musically for a while, but lyrically it’s hard to escape “I knew when I first saw you/You’d fuck like a whore” (“Not The American Average“).

On the more pop-oriented side of the post-hardcore spectrum, Falling In Reverse‘s music video for “Good Girls Bad Guys” gives us yet another example. In the video, a car pulls up and lets attractive women out of the trunk, parading them around on a kind of catwalk for the men on the set. Their only value in the space of the video is as beautiful objects; commodities that give the men their successful, masculine status. These women are only here for the purpose of reflecting the male ego back on itself in a positive light.

Screen Shot 2015-05-04 at 1.28.45 PM

This editorial isn’t here to call out anyone specifically, or even to call out men in general. “Men = bad, women = good” isn’t the idea here, and hardcore/post-hardcore/metalcore aren’t the only genres that have issues with representation of women. Rather, the purpose of this article is to call out a prevailing attitude that I think needs some reevaluation; the attitude that, to quote Laura Mulvey, “Women are bearers of meaning, not makers of meaning.”

For me, this is the link to creating a “Women of Hardcore” serial. There needs to be a shift in perspective. By collecting interviews with various female talents in the scene, we want to emphasize these people as active contributors to music and music culture, and hopefully, show other fans of hardcore–female and male–that there is a place for them, too. So let’s go make some meaning, regardless of your sexy parts.

Retrospective: Baruch College’s Music Journalism Panel

NYMIA panel

 

Being “in and of the scene” is not a hollow slogan at HXC Magazine; it is a belief and an ideal. It is crucial for us to not only report on the goings on in the hardcore, punk and metal music scenes, but to contribute to those same outlets and people. Media is as much a tool for disseminating knowledge and awareness and for actively shaping the world as it is for simply spreading the news of the day. This is why when HXC was asked to participate in a panel on music blogging and journalism at Baruch College on April 23rd, we jumped at the chance.

At the panel, we had the humbling opportunity to speak alongside representatives from fellow music media outlets Audiofemme and Village Voice to students eager to participate in the music industry. Annie White, executive director of Audiofemme, and Linda Leseman, longtime freelancer for publications like Village Voice and LA Weekly, had some excellent insight to offer: be business-minded and include clown college on your resume. (Maybe not exactly that last part, though it did help Leseman land a job once. The point is, don’t be afraid to get a little weird.) Know your stuff. Be both a force to be reckoned with and a fun-loving fan. Walk tough lines and learn how to keep your footing. Contradictions abound but in between them is where you need to be.

Other topics we discussed ranged from how to get people to notice your writing to how to interview artists to “you’re probably going to be dirt broke for a while but that’s okay, don’t panic.” Some of the most important pieces of advice given across the board had to do more with life than journalism: Try new things that maybe terrify you; get inspired; put yourself out there; don’t be afraid to assert yourself. Each panelist had their own set of accomplishments and setbacks, but all seemed to reach one common destination of music, writing, and followed passion. When it comes down to it, if there’s one fact any professional or person anywhere needs to know it’s that we all have the power to make things happen. Work hard, try to remind yourself sleeping is somewhat necessary, and go out and be in and of your scene.

This Is ‘A Tribute To Taking Back Sunday’

a tribute to taking back sunday

Alternative Press has exclusively premiered news of the upcoming A Tribute To Taking Back Sunday record with a stream of Everyone Dies In Utah’s version of “A Decade Under The Influence.” While this is not the first tributary album Pacific Ridge Records has released, it signifies something tremendously important to this music scene generally and to me personally. (Take one look at my bio and you’ll get a small impression of why that is.) Though HXC Magazine is not purposed to delivering my personal narrative, my story is bound to HXC‘s mission of making the individuals of the scene just as valued as the bands who shape it.

That fifteen bands have come together to honor and celebrate Taking Back Sunday speaks to the Long Island band’s indelible legacy. Countless artists and fans alike have been moved and impacted by the band’s music since the first time they heard “Cute Without The E (Cut From The Team)” and asked, “What the fuck was that?” and hit replay for the first of many hundreds of times. As for me, Tell All Your Friends (which I have tattooed on my hand) was the record that ignited an obsession for this kind of gritty yet deft emo punk sound that consequently evolved into my love for hardcore. I credit Taking Back Sunday with not only the development of my music taste but in part to the development of my person, and A Tribute To Taking Back Sunday, set to come out April 14th, proves that many of you have been impacted the same way.

It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what makes an album or a band revolutionary or memorable; what it is that makes them almost a larger than life institution or ideology rather than a collection of people and sounds. At the heart of it, though, lies a distinct kind of genuineness and spirit. When listening to a Taking Back Sunday album there is a sense that some part of the soul has been left there. It’s raw and it lives. This new catalog of covers serves to remind us that some albums are so seminal that they manifest lives of their own and last for generations; that any individual or collection of individuals can make a lasting impression worthy of remembrance; that our scene is one that converses and feeds back into itself and truly warrants the label of community. So to the all the undying Taking Back Sunday fans who have been so long under the influence, I hope these simple words find you well.

Check out the new Everyone Dies In Utah track over at AP and pre-order the record at Bandcamp.

Best,

A Timberwolf from New Jersey.