Tag Archives: literature

Record Review: Ice Nine Kills ‘Every Trick In The Book’

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Ice Nine Kills have stepped up their artistic game with their latest full-length record, Every Trick In The Book. As the title implies, the band borrow from some of their many literary inspirations to create their most melodic (“Tess-Timony”) and most heavy (“Hell In The Hallways”) songs to date. William Shakespeare, George Orwell and Stephen King are just a few of the authors INK turn to for their own brand of musical storytelling, and as a lit nerd myself, I’m pretty goddamn giddy about it.

Creating songs based off of personal experiences alone is a perfectly good way to go about writing music. However, when artists look to the works of other artists both in admiration and for inspiration, something special happens: A dialogue is created between the old tales and the new tracks, and in INK’s case, the conversation is exceptionally moving. Reimagining known stories in modern ways makes for not only a fun listen but an engaging one. As the listener, you start to look for clues; little pieces of the story you already know and little embellishments added in that you’re just hearing for the first time.

While the overall sound of Every Trick In The Book is very similar to that of their last full-length, The Predator Becomes They Prey, the most noticeable and impressive difference is the band’s use of added sound effects and dialogue to enhance and enliven the stories they’re telling. “The People In The Attic,” for example, based off of The Diary of Anne Frank, is not only a great song musically, but goes above and beyond when it incorporates suspenseful dialogue and threatening sounds that recreate the terrifying moment of an S.S. officer coming for the hidden Jews upstairs. Something similar happens in “Hell In The Hallways” (Carrie is announced prom queen followed by screams) and “Communion Of The Cursed” (the possessed little girl from The Exorcist adds a demonic twist to a prayer). These moments of theatricality give the record that extra umph, turning a standard Ice Nine Kills record into a noteworthy one.

Four Star Rating

Video Premiere: Ice Nine Kills “Communion of the Cursed”

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After the release of their last horror-inspired singles “Me, Myself, & Hyde” and “Bloodbath & Beyond,” Ice Nine Kills have burst through the gates with a The Exorcist themed music video for “Communion of the Cursed.” Spooky ghost stories with grandpa, demons in the mirror, levitations and possessions are all found in this highly produced video. Vocalist Spencer Charnas also goes a little crazy, and we love him for it. The winning combination of a no-holds-barred single with a well-crafted, cinematic narrative makes “Communion of the Cursed” one of the best music videos released in a while. And when the little girl demonically chants, “Her soul is mine, and mine to keep / If she dies before she wakes / I’ll find another soul to take,” you may very well need to find a new pair of pants.

The single comes from the band’s upcoming record Every Trick In The Book, which is to be released December 4th via Fearless Records.

Interview with Mike Hranica of The Devil Wears Prada

Mike Hranica of TDWP

You never really know what to expect when you walk into an interview. Whatever your expectations may be, however, I doubt you would expect to walk in on your interviewee casually reading a Fyodor Dostoyevsky novel that would seriously hurt if someone decided to use it as a weapon. Meet Mike Hranica, vocalist of the well-known metalcore band The Devil Wears Prada, and avid consumer of Russian literature.

But intimidating books are not all he talks about. In this interview with Hranica at the Holmdel, NJ date of Mayhem Fest 2015, we discuss the band’s upcoming Space EP and why the Zombie EP remains so important, starting out in skate parks, and, if you’ve ever wondered what TDWP would look like as comic book characters, you may not be wondering for long…

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Interview with Shawn Milke of Alesana

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“I control my vision and my vision is you, the fans.”

Alesana have led arguably one of the most prolific careers of any hardcore band of the past decade, not necessarily in terms of the amount of albums released, but in terms of the amount of work put into each record. Anyone would be hard-pressed to name a band as consumed by the art of storytelling and as loyal to their artistic vision and their fans as this theatrical six piece sweetcore family. Yes, family, because that’s what Shawn Milke (vocals, guitar, piano) insists good music is all about. In the interview below, HXC picks Milke’s brain about the upcoming Alesana record, the self-started label Revival Recordings, and why there’s no place for ego or dollar signs in true art.

HXC: Why did you choose Madeleine L’Engle’s Time Quintet as a lens to finish Annabel’s story?

Shawn Milke: Well Dennis and I really wanted to involve time travel in the third installment of The Annabel Trilogy.  Whereas with The Emptiness and A Place Where The Sun Is Silent we chose the literature and then built our story in support of it, with Confessions it was the other way around.  We decided on time travel and then discussed literature that we enjoyed surrounding that concept.  L’Engle writes with a social conscience at the core which is something we love to do as well.  There are several really cool allusions and nods to L’Engle throughout Confessions.  

A Place Where The Sun Is Silent was even more winding and complex than The Emptiness in terms of sound. Sonically, what can fans expect of Confessions?

It’s intense.  When describing the record to my wife I’ve used the phrase “panic attack” to explain several of the movements.  There is a lot of chaos but on the other hand there is also a lot of super spacey and atmospheric passes.  After all, this is a story about bending time and space.  There are a lot of moments where you feel like you need to catch your breath.  Several of the tracks are more progressive than anything we have ever done and that was very intentional.  The storyline is coming to a climax and, especially with a handful of the songs, I very much wanted the listening experience to mirror the intensity.  In the past we have had labels to please and “singles” to release so we would re-structure certain tunes to fit that particular mold.  This time around it was about the album as a whole, about the whole creative experience being true to itself first and foremost.  This was the most organic approach to writing a record that we’ve had since On Frail Wings of Vanity and Wax in terms of going with our gut.  Pat and I were very on the same page musically and Dennis and I brought the story to life lyrically in a way that we never have before.  It was a blast and I’m very, very proud of Confessions.

alesana confessions

Why did you choose the track “Comedy of Errors” for a short film?

The decision to use Comedy of Errors for our short film/music video was an easy one.  Stylistically, it is all over the map and really showcases what Confessions is all about, musically.  It is the third chapter in the story and is a pretty critical turning point in terms of setting up the rest of the prose.  Working with director Justin Reich on this was awesome.  It is a dream come true to get to do a music video that is more a short film than anything.

You use several different media to tell your stories; film, literature–even the instrumentals on your records help narrate what the lyrics are saying. Why do you like taking this multilayered approach?

I love for our records to be multi-dimensional.  A fan can choose to simply enjoy a song or they can dive headfirst into our fictional world.  The idea is for the music to tell a story on its own before it’s even concerned with the lyrics and prose.  The more layers you create, the more emotions you can convey.  When you’ve layered something so dynamically and drastically it can then become the absence of layers that conveys the emotion.  A brief moment of silence or a single cello can be just as effective as a full blown orchestra behind three-part guitar harmonies, layered vocals, and screams.  It’s always about the push and pull, the building of the tension.  Dynamics are everything.

How does it feel knowing The Annabel Trilogy is ending? 

It is extremely bittersweet.  On one hand I am extremely proud to see Alesana see the trilogy to its completion.  On the other hand, Annabel has been a part of our creative psyche for the better part of nearly six years.  It is tough to say goodbye to her but I am also pleased with her sendoff.  It was a pleasure spending so much time with her and it is because of her that we have developed one of the most dedicated and caring core fan bases in the world.

It’s still early in the game to think about next moves, but do you see yourselves taking on other concept efforts this size in the future?

It’s hard to say, but I don’t think we would do quite this magnitude again.  I’m very big on, “Okay, we accomplished that.  Now, what can we do that is different and challenging?”  We’ve done a trilogy so to do another one would feel like regurgitation.  I have several ideas for our next EP that I am super excited about and it would create a whole new set of storytelling challenges.

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You’ve earned yourselves an intensely loyal cult following over the years. How do you think that idea of community translates to Revival Recordings?

The hope is that our most core fans will also believe in the positive and artistic community we are creating at Revival Recordings.  Music is the flame that lights my artistic world and I will only sign bands who push themselves as hard as I have, creatively.  Positivity, open-mindedness, and a lack of ego are all major prerequisites for what we are trying to build. Good Music By Good People is not just a slogan, it is a way of life for our family of artists and our team.

What exactly are you trying to revive?

The belief that good art is paramount.  I understand that the music industry is, in fact, a business and, in order to sustain a career, money must be made and success must be had.  However, success is in the eye of the beholder and here at Revival we stare through a lens built by art, not the industry.  Surround yourself with the right people and keep your focus on the art, the songs, the music itself and you can only win.  It is up to us, the fans of great music and art, to not allow the industry to dictate what we enjoy.  Fight for what you love and together we can revive an otherwise narrow-minded, dollar sign driven industry controlled by the few.

Revival is a very DIY project, much like Alesana’s overall approach to making music has been. Why do you think “doing it yourself” is so important?

If you do it yourself then you have the power to dictate your goals, your dreams, and your destination.  I refuse to be told by some industry drone what my vision should be; I control my vision and my vision is you, the fans.  I will be striving to develop great bands comprised of good people who do things the right way for as long as I’m allowed to live on this earth and I’ll be damned if I will ever base my decisions off of the opinion of some corporate zombie who wouldn’t know a good record if it kicked him in the ass.

VIDEO PREMIERE: Ice Nine Kills “Me, Myself, & Hyde”

Ice Nine Kills Me Myself & Hyde

Ice Nine Kills have released a lyric video for their new single “Me, Myself, & Hyde,” and like the original tale it’s based in (CGI) London. More complex than the average text-over-image clip, the video for the new song illustrates the Robert Louis Stevenson-inspired world with revived creepiness. Manic instrumentations, frenzied vocals, and a little more than an ounce of blood color this reinvented version of the classic story. Watch the video below and release your inner Hyde.