Tag Archives: youtube

VIDEO REVIEW: What’s Right & Wrong with ISSUES ‘Headspace’

Video correspondent Mike McNamara is totally, 100%. completely, absolutely and unforgivably serious when he reviews the new Issues record, Headspace. Haven’t heard the album yet? Watch it. You have heard the album? Watch it and see your feelings get put into words. Funny words. Inspiring words. Words to shake the foundation of the world.

MORE: Mike McNamara – Stop Moshing 2k16

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VIDEO: Stop Moshing 2k16

We’ve all seen the bloodshed and the bruised faces. We’ve had our ribs crushed and our teeth knocked out. It’s time to put an end to it. We’re talking, of course, about moshing. Can you help us stop the violence? One Mike McNamara is going to try.

INTERVIEW: A War Within ft. Levi Benton (Miss May I)

We caught up with vocalist Spencer Maybe of Detroit, MI band A War Within after their set on the New York City date of the Drop The Gloves Tour, featuring Sirens & Sailors, The Plot In You, Miss May I, and Blessthefall. Bathed in the red light of the lounge we probably shouldn’t have had access to, we chatted about Backstreet Boys, what it’s like to be an unsigned band on a major tour, and how he and Levi Benton of Miss May I (who appears mid-interview) have a very, very special relationship.

Continue reading INTERVIEW: A War Within ft. Levi Benton (Miss May I)

Music Video Of The Week: Sunrise Skater Kids “First World Tragedy”

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Jarrod Alonge‘s parody album Beating A Dead Horse came out earlier this year and now he’s picked up the stick again for the new Deluxe Ultra-Limited Exclusive Undead Edition. Alonge has added six new tracks to his hilarious yet surprisingly well-crafted collection of commentary on this music scene, including the pop punk “First World Tragedy” by Sunrise Skater Kids. Check out the music video for it below and grab the rest of the new tracks while you’re at it! Just try not to drop your iPhone.

NEW TRACKS:

“Pray for Progress” by Vermicide Violence
“Brevé Canzoné” by Canadian Softball
“Waifu (feat. Drewsif Stalin)” by Rectangles
“First World Tragedy” by Sunrise Skater Kids
“2 Warped 4 da Remix” by $wagCh0de
“Suck My 401k (feat. Chris Linck)” by Amidst The Grave’s Demons

Want MORE Jarrod Alonge? Check out the lyric video for “Pray For Progress” HERE.

ROCKtober Playlist

ROCKtober

If Halloween isn’t your favorite holiday, you’re just not brutal enough. Here are 13 spooky, gory, and all-around badass tracks for you to get your creep on. And if your favorite horror-themed song isn’t on this list, let us know in the comments! We’d love to hear what you’re listening to this fall.

Continue reading ROCKtober Playlist

Miss May I Stream ‘Deathless’ Full Album

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Since the combative single “I.H.E.” was released, fans everywhere have been waiting to know what the full new Miss May I album would sound like. Wait no longer! The entire Deathless stream is on the Rise Records YouTube channel right now. Check it below and let us know what you think! We’ll get you our opinion soon enough…

Senses Fail Stream New Album ‘Pull The Thorns From Your Heart’

Buddy Senses Fail commentary

Senses Fail‘s new album, Pull The Thorns From Your Heart, is out now via Pure Noise Records and is streaming in full on their YouTube channel. Accompanying the songs is additional commentary from frontman Buddy Nielson after each track. The new record follows the more straightforward hardcore sound that was begun with Senses Fail’s last album, Renacer, along with some more positive lyricism.

Pull The Thorns From Your Heart is available for purchase on iTunes. Check out the stream below and tell us your thoughts! We’ll let you know what we think soon enough…

Jarrod Alonge Releases Album, ‘Beating A Dead Horse’

A lot of people like to make fun of metal and hardcore, but no one enjoys it as much as metalheads and hardcore kids do. It turns out the old saying is right: If you can’t beat ’em, join em. Literally. One of the foremost satirists of the underground, Jarrod Alonge, dropped his parody album today, appropriately titled Beating A Dead Horse.

Satirizing major tropes of the scene from idolized misogyny (“Misogyneric feat. Mattie Montgomery”) to Chiodos and The Devil Wears Prada-style song names (“The Distance Between You and Me is Longer Than the Title of This Song”), it’s clear that Alonge wants you to laugh, but just maybe to think a little bit, too. The YouTuber pokes fun at everything from pop punk to breakdowns, and also the fact that he’s totally getting away with it.

So take a few minutes out of crying over your ex and ordering pizza to listen to the album and let us know what you think! For a taste of the (almost) plagiarism, check out the lyric video below to “Hey Jarrod, What’s That Song Again?” and see how many bands you can name that get ripped off in four minutes.

Bare Meaning: The Role of Women in Music Culture

Photo taken from Pinterest
Photo taken from Pinterest

There has been increasing talk of the lack of women in the hardcore scene lately. Yet for all the talk, there doesn’t seem to be adequate exploration of why this is so or of what’s truly going on here. Relative to other rock genres like metal and alternative, hardcore seems to be the most homogenous and male-dominated of all. The reasons for this phenomenon may be far and wide, but I’d like to point to one particular issue that I’ve noticed in my years of listening to post-hardcore–the lyrics.

YouTuber Jared Dines hilariously sums it up in one of his satirical videos of the scene, “10 Styles of Metal.” A few seconds into the video, when the genre title “POST HARDCORE” holds above his head, Dines elucidates in unclean vocals: “My girlfriend broke up with me/ I’m really upset about it/ It’s really my own fault/ But I’m gonna blame her.” While saying that all post-hardcore bands sport the same lyrical content is an overgeneralization, any fan can laugh at how common and, for the most part, accurate Dines’ criticism actually is. Women tend to be given a certain symbolic status of vixen or betrayer or, like in a recent Ice Nine Kills music video, succubus.

Personally, I love the music metalcore band Ice Nine Kills make, but I’ve got to admit that the video for “The Fastest Way To A Girl’s Heart Is Through Her Ribcage” is troubling. It’s become so commonplace now that we no longer realize it, or if we do, we let it pass by us as mere fact–the idea that woman is the downfall of man. In this particular case, a (sexually) voracious female demon that we watch vocalist Spencer Charnas brutally kill is the subject matter. Coupled with lyrics like “You’d be just as sexy bleeding,” this visual takes the trope to a more obvious extreme. While some of you out there may argue “it’s just a music video” or “you’re taking this too seriously,” I’d like to suggest that sometimes the effects outweigh the intent. Do most guys approach their actions or the art they make with the explicit idea that they’re going to villainize women? I’d like to guess not. But the unconscious ideas are there and they keep getting nonchalantly perpetuated, and in this instance, as an INK fan, become alienating to me.

From_Death_to_Destiny

Perhaps the very icon for this kind of behavior is British powerhouse Asking Alexandria; or, to get right down to it, ex-frontman Danny Worsnop. The cover art for the band’s latest album From Death To Destiny is a prime example of the female figure being reduced to a purely sexual and symbolic role for the male frontman. In the image (above), the woman is placed naked in a vending machine at the male rock star’s disposal should he have a few bucks on him to spare. She is a resource of pleasure for him, an object. In short, she is dehumanized. Take virtually any strand of lyrics from Asking Alexandria over the years and you’ll find something similar. Again, AA is a band I’ve enjoyed listening to musically for a while, but lyrically it’s hard to escape “I knew when I first saw you/You’d fuck like a whore” (“Not The American Average“).

On the more pop-oriented side of the post-hardcore spectrum, Falling In Reverse‘s music video for “Good Girls Bad Guys” gives us yet another example. In the video, a car pulls up and lets attractive women out of the trunk, parading them around on a kind of catwalk for the men on the set. Their only value in the space of the video is as beautiful objects; commodities that give the men their successful, masculine status. These women are only here for the purpose of reflecting the male ego back on itself in a positive light.

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This editorial isn’t here to call out anyone specifically, or even to call out men in general. “Men = bad, women = good” isn’t the idea here, and hardcore/post-hardcore/metalcore aren’t the only genres that have issues with representation of women. Rather, the purpose of this article is to call out a prevailing attitude that I think needs some reevaluation; the attitude that, to quote Laura Mulvey, “Women are bearers of meaning, not makers of meaning.”

For me, this is the link to creating a “Women of Hardcore” serial. There needs to be a shift in perspective. By collecting interviews with various female talents in the scene, we want to emphasize these people as active contributors to music and music culture, and hopefully, show other fans of hardcore–female and male–that there is a place for them, too. So let’s go make some meaning, regardless of your sexy parts.